A typical “I” house of the late 19th Century, this farm has been owned by Quaker families Moore, McMillan, Linn, and now Speaight. There is a farm equipment sales center adjacent which markets fresh eggs. The frame of the old Lytle Creek Meeting…

Alice Hale (1865-1945) was the daughter of Alfred and Rachel Hadley Hale and the great-granddaughter of pioneer Quaker settlers Jacob and Martha Harvey Hale. In 1890 she married E. Marshall Renner from Clermont County and had two sons. The 1915…

The Maden (or Madden) family was among the earliest settlers in the Springfield Meeting community, purchasing over 400 acres of Survey #2371 just east of the Harvey settlement. George Maden (1759-1823) was born near Philadelphia and lived in North…

William Hale (1835-1920) was a grandson of original Quaker settlers Jacob and Martha Harvey Hale, and had a large farm and livestock business. He was the grandfather of Dr. Kelley Hale, who founded the first hospital in Wilmington. The house now has…

Along Todds Fork is an organic farm run by a Quaker family. They sell to the local market, and have (in season) organic produce and flowers in a small, cooled market house. There are fields and high hoops on both sides of the river. Stop and shop!

As you continue on Lebanon Road, at the top of a glacial moraine hill that sits above Little Creek, there is a closed driveway back a long lane where you can barely see a house. This is 1848 house built by settler Caleb Harvey for his family, and it…

Eli Harvey (1803-1872) came as a child with his family and the six other Harvey families from North Carolina in 1806-1807. He married Sarah Fallis in 1824, bought part of his father's land, and established his household on the newly laid out…

In 1871 James Hadley (1846-1917) built a new house on Lebanon Road for his wife Isabelle Moore Hadley and their young family. It was white with tall green shutters and scrollwork on the porches and under the eaves. Inside was a parlor and a music…

The Wilmington-Lebanon Pike was laid out in 1810 when Clinton County was formed from parts of Warren and Highland Counties, in order to connect the new Clinton County seat of Wilmington to the old Warren County seat of Lebanon. While the earliest…

The extended Harlan family was among the earliest Quaker settlers in this region and they were among the founders of Springfield Meeting and Lytle Creek Meeting. They came with their widowed mother Edith Carter Harlan (1749-1830) from Rowan County…

Built by David Halloway around 1805, this was the first tavern on the route of the Accommodation Line. By 1814 Quaker Joel Wright purchased the structure. Henry Clay stayed here in 1825, and Charles Dickens in 1842. Other prominent owners were…

William Harvey (1797-1866), son of settlers of the Springfield Meeting community, Isaac and Lydia Dicks Harvey, recorded the plat for Harveysburg in early 1829, opened the first store, and soon established a large pork packing business. His cousin…

The Lukens were among the earliest Quaker settlers on the Harveysburg and Waynesville areas. This home is one of several still-standing houses of the Quaker Lukens families. In 1812 Levi Lukens purchased the 1000 acre survey of Revolutionary War…

Lewis Dakin bought this property from James Haines in 1850, and built this house soon afterward. Amos Underwood (1786-1867) from York County, PA, first settled in Liberty Township and then purchased this property in Chester Township, Clinton County,…

The Dakin-Underwood East Brick House was built by James Dakin around 1848. James was a descendant of Preserved Fish Dakin from New York state, where he had served in the American Revolution before coming to Ohio. This house and farm were acquired by…